Chuck’s Arm

3 Dec

Six years post stroke, Chuck’s arm remains paralyzed. Many stroke survivors do get function back, and it’s hard to predict who will or will not. I decided to act as though Chuck would and became very proactive, spending hours surfing the Net looking for alternative or supplemental treatments and assistive devices. I want to share my findings, in case they might help someone else in some way.

Clinical Trials
Clinical trials are free but experimental, designed to test new therapies or medical treatments. We ended up not being involved in any, but I spent many hours searching the lists. They are typically sponsored by the federal government and private hospitals, universities, and research centers. Here are some links to information:

http://www.stroke.org/site/PageServer?pagename=clinicaltrials
http://www.strokecenter.org/trials/
http://www.centerwatch.com/clinical-trials/listings/condition/142/stroke

Constraint Induced Therapy (CIT)
I read about CIT in The Brain That Changes Itself, by Norman Diodge. CIT involves restricting the use of the functional hand and thereby forcing the affected arm to work. The action of movement, even if a therapist manually produces it, causes neurons to fire. The arm communicates to the brain, “Hey, I’m still here! I need neurons.” Treatment takes place daily and lasts several hours. This kind of intensive therapy has been shown to be more effective than conventional therapy, which usually takes place three times a week. In order to qualify for this program, potential participants must have the ability to make a fist, which Chuck never was able to do.

The Mirror Box
The brain is the most complex organ of all the organs, containing the universe and the sum of all we know, as well as managing all our involuntary bodily functions and reflexes. This is why we don’t have to think about breathing. When brain cells are killed, as in a stroke, they don’t grow back. Luckily, the brain has plasticity; it can compensate for such loss with neurons, which can grow new pathways around the damaged area. However, when a limb, especially an arm, is paralyzed as a result of a stroke, it suffers “learned disuse,” and the brain has to be coaxed into giving back function to the arm. Sometimes, it has to be tricked. This is how the mirror box works.

The mirror box is constructed of slick fabric stretched around wires. On one side on the outside of the box is a mirror. The affected arm is placed inside the box, where it cannot be seen; the functional hand rests outside the box, facing the mirror. The patient moves the functional arm while looking at its reflection in the mirror, imagining he is moving the affected arm. The brain is thereby tricked into communicating with the arm, which is what has to happen in order for the arm to move. Best of all, they only cost $40.

The Biffy
In some cases, the caretaker of  the stroke survivor has to assist in cleaning after a bowel movement. In order to avoid this task and to spare Chuck’s dignity, I turned to the Internet, where I discovered a gadget that improved our quality of life to a great degree: the Biffy. It fits onto the toilet bowl and diverts water, by way of the intake valve, through a spout that sends a jet of water into the nether regions when the user pulls a lever. The cost was $100, well worth it. The company’s web site is located at https://www.biffy.com.

Knowledge is Power
I also found other sources of information on the Internet, such as free magazines Stroke Smart and The Stroke Connection and books like My Stroke of Insight; Head Cases: Brain Injury and Its Aftermath; and The Brain That Changes Itself. I read as much as I could, on line and off, about stroke.

Educating myself was one of the best ways I was able to help Chuck. I gathered a mass of information—some helpful, some not—much of which no doctor or therapist ever told me about. In addition, doing the work helped me feel more in control of a virtually uncontrollable situation. Fact-finding became a form of free therapy, which kept me from feeling helpless and filled up many hours that otherwise might have been spent despairing.

Advertisements

One Response to “Chuck’s Arm”

  1. Linda Christine December 3, 2013 at 6:49 pm #

    Laura, just read your post and so much appreciate all the info…The Biffy really sounded neat…Thanks for all your comments…Emily just called and I told her to read today’s post.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: