Tag Archives: books about caretaking

A Plea for Help

17 Apr

On August 31, 2007, my husband Chuck and I woke up and life had changed, overnight. He had suffered a massive stroke. I called 911 and he was rushed to the hospital, where he nearly died, twice; first, from the original event, which deprived his brain of oxygen; second, the next week when the clot burst loose and flooded his brain with blood.

He was in the hospital and rehab for seven weeks. When he came home, he was unable to walk, bathe, use the toilet or dress without my assistance for six months. We continued therapy for the next year—including a trip to the University of Michigan Aphasia Program for intensive speech therapy—an arduous and exhausting process for both of us.

While his leg became strong enough for him to walk with a cane, and he learned to bathe, use the toilet and dress himself, he still has extreme limitations. He has no language; and by that I mean he cannot talk, read or write, and has trouble comprehending the spoken word. His right arm is permanently paralyzed. This man, a former professor of education for a major university, was transformed into a silent homebody who spends his days watching television.

I am his only caretaker and have no resources designated for that purpose and no sustained, consistent help from family. I am unable to work fulltime because 1) there are no jobs that would pay me enough to make it worth hiring help for Chuck and 2) I’m almost 60 and am getting passed over for younger candidates for the fulltime jobs that would pay me enough.

Chuck receives Social Security Disability Income, not enough to make expenses. I work part-time as a writer and a dog trainer, but these are not reliable sources of income. I have written two books, one of which I self-published on Amazon (Stroke Happens: A Caretaker’s Memoir) but which lacks national distribution or advertising and so did not bring in much money. The other was from a regional press, and I only received 7% of what little profit was made by the publishing company.

Neither of us have trust funds or inheritances. We have therefore had to draw from Chuck’s once healthy retirement fund—which, before the stroke, would have taken care of both of us for the rest of our lives after retirement—which has fallen to $10,000. When that is gone, which will happen in less than a year, we won’t be able to make our monthly expenses.

At that point, I am afraid I will have to face a difficult decision; that is, sell our house, place Chuck in a nursing home, and move in with someone while I try to find some kind of income.

Keep in mind that for more than ten years I have taken care of this man, who otherwise would have been a burden on the taxpayer as a Medicaid recipient. I have gotten no compensation and in fact have lost ten years of income (I was a college English instruction) and investment into my own Social Security fund.

Because we don’t have a savings account or emergency fund, I have had to use our only credit card to pay for such things as a new heating-and-air-conditioning system; two pulled teeth and bone implants (I have not actually replaced the teeth because I can’t afford it); and the trip to Michigan Aphasia Clinic. We are very close to the limit of $26,000 and I refuse to get another credit card. I am asking for help in paying off this debt. If you would like to contribute, please go to https://www.gofundme.com/helpstrokesurvivorchucklinnell.

Some people might my request impertinent. I would argue that Chuck and I have had extremely bad luck and that, through no fault of our own, found ourselves in a situation the horror of which is almost impossible to describe. I would not wish it on my worst enemy. I have done my best to make Chuck happy and comfortable and to do whatever it takes to keep him at home. I would like to continue to do so, but the burden of debt is crushing and I fear it will destroy us. Having one huge expense disappear would be such a relief, and so I am hoping some compassionate people will help us out and contribute to our fund. Thank you and God bless.

Update: a few days after I posted my plea for help on GoFundMe, Chuck fell and broke his arm. We were in the ER from 10pm (Friday the 13th!) until 6am Saturday.

 

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Featured in Local Paper

2 Dec

I am excited to say Chuck and I were featured in our local paper! Article below by Jason Evans, who did an excellent job.

CLEMSON — Like most married couples, Laura Garren and Chuck Linnell like to rib each other and chuckle at the inside jokes that come with any long relationship.

Their relationship was radically redefined in a matter of seconds in 2008, when Linnell suffered a catastrophic stroke at the age of 56.

Garren recently self-published “Stroke Happens: A Caretaker’s Memoir,” a book chronicling just how their lives changed in the aftermath, as Linnell began the recovery process and Garren navigated their new reality.

Garren discussed the book during a signing the pair held at Nick’s Tavern last Saturday afternoon. An odd place for literature, the Clemson tavern is a special place for the couple — it’s where they first met.

Before his stroke, Linnell taught at Clemson University as an education professor. He was well thought of by his students, so much so that a piece of graffiti on campus once read, “Dr. Linnell rocks!”

“He used to be a great talker,” Garren said. “He could tell some great stories.”

The stroke robbed Linnell of his ability to speak.

“He knows what’s going on, he just can’t express with any language at all,” Garren said. “It’s hard not being able to have conversations. It could have been worse, though — he could have been too disabled to be able to come home.”

Garren wrote the book in the hopes that it would help others.

“(I hoped) it would help other people who were in my position because I had tried to find books written by stroke survivors or people taking care of stroke survivors and there wasn’t that much out there,” Garren said. “I wanted to get it out there because maybe it could help some people.”

Strokes can happen to anyone at any age, even to people like Linnell, a very fit, seemingly healthy man who had no risk factors, according to his doctors.

“He had no warning signs,” Garren said. “Warning signs, that’s what saves people. Anything happening just on one side of the body — droop, paralysis, weakness, a one-sided, really bad headache, if the person suddenly has trouble speaking or understanding speech.

“Anything that’s going on one side, don’t wait to call 911, because time is brain,” Garren continued, alluding to the damage that can rapidly occur during a stroke.

It wasn’t Linnell’s first brush with death. He was in a car accident decades earlier that left him in a coma for weeks.

But his survival at that time came with a cost later.

“It wiped out a lot of real estate,” Garren said. “He didn’t have as much to compensate with as he would have had he not had that first accident.”

A writer and teacher, Garren quit her job to take care of Linnell.

The book draws from emails Garren wrote to friends and family in the early days after Linnell’s stroke and beyond.

“I didn’t really remember a whole lot that had happened because of the trauma, medical post-traumatic stress,” Garren said.

“Those emails generated a lot of support and built community for us. So I referred back to the emails because then I could read them and chart the progress. That filled in some blanks for me,” she said.

The book details the therapy Linnell went through to get back on his feet. Garren had to navigate the confusing, often frightening medical bureaucracy on behalf of her husband.

One idea to get the book out into the community is to leave copies in therapy facilities, Garren said.

“Maybe somebody who needs to read it, and should read it, will read it,” she said. “They can connect and see, ‘Oh, somebody else has gone through this.”

Writing the book became a borderline obsession for Garren, she said. Though a few publishers turned her down, she pushed forward with the memoir.

“I would sit down and write three to five hours, five days a week,” Garren said.

The first draft was completed in about three months.

The book’s subtitle, “A Caretaker’s Memoir,” reflects on her feelings about the situation she was thrust into.

“Caregiver feels more voluntary to me,” she said. “I was forced into this position, and although it was a choice to stay with him and take care of him, it didn’t feel like a choice.

“So I decided I was going to continue to call myself a caretaker because something was taken — the marriage as it was,” Garren continued. “The life we had, the things we had planned — all of that changed.”

Her book describes her process of coming to terms with what happened, not only to her husband, but to herself.

“He probably handled it better than I did,” Garren said. “He’s a trooper. I’ve rarely seen him lose his temper or get upset.”

The book features drawings by Linnell throughout. He added drawings beneath Garren’s signature during the book signing.

“He was always a good sketch artist,” Garren said.

The book also serves as a way to thank all the people who have helped the couple during their transition. Garren writes movingly of the support that surrounded her and of the isolation she felt at times while caring for her husband 24/7. Friends raised more than $10,000 to allow them to travel to and stay in Michigan in order for Linnell to be enrolled in an intensive therapy program.

“I wanted to sort of acknowledge them and thank them,” Garren said.

The couple also drew support from their four-legged friends, many of which are described in the book. One dog even visited Linnell in the hospital soon after his stroke.

“Whoever I married was going to have to love dogs,” Garren said. “They’re real, real important in the narrative of our lives.”

At that, Linnell voices his agreement by imitating a dog’s howl.

Garren is now a dog trainer, becoming certified in 2012.

“I use my writing skills with that,” she said of the treatment plans she creates for her clients and their owners. She’s also teaching part-time at Clemson again.

“Stroke Happens” is available on Amazon, alongside her first book, “The Chattooga River: A Natural and Cultural History.”

For more information on the book, follow the “Stroke Happens” page on Facebook.

jevans@upstatetoday.com | (864) 973-6681

Follow on Twitter @citizenjason5

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