Tag Archives: stroke recovery

Stroke Happens Featured in Local Paper

2 Dec

I am excited to say Stroke Happens was featured in our local paper! Article below by Jason Evans, who did an outstanding job.

CLEMSON — Like most married couples, Laura Garren and Chuck Linnell like to rib each other and chuckle at the inside jokes that come with any long relationship.

IMG_5554Their relationship was radically redefined in a matter of seconds in 2008, when Linnell suffered a catastrophic stroke at the age of 56.

Garren recently self-published “Stroke Happens: A Caretaker’s Memoir,” a book chronicling just how their lives changed in the aftermath, as Linnell began the recovery process and Garren navigated their new reality.

Garren discussed the book during a signing the pair held at Nick’s Tavern last Saturday afternoon. An odd place for literature, the Clemson tavern is a special place for the couple — it’s where they first met.

Before his stroke, Linnell taught at Clemson University as an education professor. He was well thought of by his students, so much so that a piece of graffiti on campus once read, “Dr. Linnell rocks!”

“He used to be a great talker,” Garren said. “He could tell some great stories.”

The stroke robbed Linnell of his ability to speak.

“He knows what’s going on, he just can’t express with any language at all,” Garren said. “It’s hard not being able to have conversations. It could have been worse, though — he could have been too disabled to be able to come home.”

Garren wrote the book in the hopes that it would help others.

“(I hoped) it would help other people who were in my position because I had tried to find books written by stroke survivors or people taking care of stroke survivors and there wasn’t that much out there,” Garren said. “I wanted to get it out there because maybe it could help some people.”

Strokes can happen to anyone at any age, even to people like Linnell, a very fit, seemingly healthy man who had no risk factors, according to his doctors.

“He had no warning signs,” Garren said. “Warning signs, that’s what saves people. Anything happening just on one side of the body — droop, paralysis, weakness, a one-sided, really bad headache, if the person suddenly has trouble speaking or understanding speech.

“Anything that’s going on one side, don’t wait to call 911, because time is brain,” Garren continued, alluding to the damage that can rapidly occur during a stroke.

It wasn’t Linnell’s first brush with death. He was in a car accident decades earlier that left him in a coma for weeks.

But his survival at that time came with a cost later.

“It wiped out a lot of real estate,” Garren said. “He didn’t have as much to compensate with as he would have had he not had that first accident.”

A writer and teacher, Garren quit her job to take care of Linnell.

The book draws from emails Garren wrote to friends and family in the early days after Linnell’s stroke and beyond.

“I didn’t really remember a whole lot that had happened because of the trauma, medical post-traumatic stress,” Garren said.

“Those emails generated a lot of support and built community for us. So I referred back to the emails because then I could read them and chart the progress. That filled in some blanks for me,” she said.

The book details the therapy Linnell went through to get back on his feet. Garren had to navigate the confusing, often frightening medical bureaucracy on behalf of her husband.

One idea to get the book out into the community is to leave copies in therapy facilities, Garren said.

“Maybe somebody who needs to read it, and should read it, will read it,” she said. “They can connect and see, ‘Oh, somebody else has gone through this.”

Writing the book became a borderline obsession for Garren, she said. Though a few publishers turned her down, she pushed forward with the memoir.

“I would sit down and write three to five hours, five days a week,” Garren said.

The first draft was completed in about three months.

The book’s subtitle, “A Caretaker’s Memoir,” reflects on her feelings about the situation she was thrust into.

“Caregiver feels more voluntary to me,” she said. “I was forced into this position, and although it was a choice to stay with him and take care of him, it didn’t feel like a choice.

“So I decided I was going to continue to call myself a caretaker because something was taken — the marriage as it was,” Garren continued. “The life we had, the things we had planned — all of that changed.”

Her book describes her process of coming to terms with what happened, not only to her husband, but to herself.

“He probably handled it better than I did,” Garren said. “He’s a trooper. I’ve rarely seen him lose his temper or get upset.”

The book features drawings by Linnell throughout. He added drawings beneath Garren’s signature during the book signing.

“He was always a good sketch artist,” Garren said.

The book also serves as a way to thank all the people who have helped the couple during their transition. Garren writes movingly of the support that surrounded her and of the isolation she felt at times while caring for her husband 24/7. Friends raised more than $10,000 to allow them to travel to and stay in Michigan in order for Linnell to be enrolled in an intensive therapy program.

“I wanted to sort of acknowledge them and thank them,” Garren said.

The couple also drew support from their four-legged friends, many of which are described in the book. One dog even visited Linnell in the hospital soon after his stroke.

“Whoever I married was going to have to love dogs,” Garren said. “They’re real, real important in the narrative of our lives.”

At that, Linnell voices his agreement by imitating a dog’s howl.

Garren is now a dog trainer, becoming certified in 2012.

“I use my writing skills with that,” she said of the treatment plans she creates for her clients and their owners. She’s also teaching part-time at Clemson again.

“Stroke Happens” is available on Amazon, alongside her first book, “The Chattooga River: A Natural and Cultural History.”

For more information on the book, follow the “Stroke Happens” page on Facebook.

jevans@upstatetoday.com | (864) 973-6681

Follow on Twitter @citizenjason5

How to Communicate With Someone Who Has No Language

4 Dec

When I tell people that Chuck’s stroke left him without language, the first question is usually, “Can he read?” Is reading language? Yes? Then the answer is, “No, he cannot read. Or write, or speak.” Furthermore, his comprehension of spoken language is poor.

Chuck has aphasia, a condition that can result from a stroke or other head injury and results in a loss of language; and apraxia, the ability to manipulate the musculature of the mouth in order to produce sound. (Which is beside the point in his case, sense he has no verbal capacity.) So how do we communicate? One way is through supportive communication. I’ll explain it as it was to me, then reveal which techniques worked best for us; you may find some of these suggestions helpful.

GarrenFigure8

How to Engage in Supportive Communication

1. Choose a time when Chuck is fresh and a place with few or no distractions. People who suffer from the affects of a stroke or head injury tire easily and are easily distracted by extraneous noise or activity.

2. Make sure Chuck has his dry-erase board and marker, picture dictionary, photos and photo albums.

  • Dry-erase and marker. The dry-erase board and marker were absolutely brilliant assistive tools and were suggested not by a speech therapist but by my niece Anna, who is a counselor and an artist. Chuck, himself a skilled artist, is able to sketch representative, descriptive, often comical drawings to indicate ideas and needs.
  • Picture dictionary. Chuck was provided a picture dictionary while at the speech therapy “camp,” but found it troublesome to use. Too much was going on in the illustrations, say a market full of people, food, items and activities. To identify a single item—let’s say an apple (to indicate he wanted one for a snack)—took too much effort. His vision deficit probably contributed: he has a right field cut, meaning he lacks vision on the inside of his left eye and the outside of his right eye, a result of the stroke.
  • Photos and photo albums. Photos and albums worked well for Chuck because he recognized himself and others and had positive associations and memories connected to the people and events in the pictures. They also prompted name retrieval. Part of Chuck’s cognitive deficits include not being able to visualize whom I’m referring when I say the person’s name; he has to actually see the person or a photo thereof.

3. Ask him if he has a topic he would like to discuss, using one or all of the tools above.

4. When he points to or draws something, ask him to say it. Give him time to formulate the word, and ask if he would like you to write the word. If he continues to struggle after about 20 seconds, or if he asks for help, prompt him. If he cannot get it by himself, say the word and have him repeat it. Be patient. Give Chuck time to process, prepare, and articulate. This process will be fluid, so continue using the technique described as the conversation moves from topic to topic.

5. Spend the same amount of time telling him about yourself or something of interest to you or how your day is going. Speak slowly, repeat frequently, and use the dry-erase board to write key words and illustrate concepts in order to increase his comprehension. Newspapers and magazines are a good source of topics. Be patient. Give him time to understand your message. Repeat the message as needed.

6. After about a half-hour, progress to an exercise or game.

Other Things to Remember

If you are talking to Chuck, look directly at him. I have noticed that since Chuck is unable to contribute to a conversation, people tend to ignore him because, I suppose, he cannot contribute. Ignoring him is not only rude but also can intensify the isolation and loneliness frequently experienced by people who have aphasia.

Keep it short and simple. Chuck gets frustrated when someone talks to him and he doesn’t understand, or when he tries to express an idea but cannot make himself understood. Yes/no questions are best. Don’t talk too much; it’s okay to just share space with him.

I’ve been told that a hallmark of aphasia can include a disinterest in the lives of others (as well as other personality changes). I’m not sure if this is organic/structural or the result of being the center of attention during a long period of rehab. Chuck definitely has become detached since his stroke, his emotional repertoire drastically reduced. Luckily, he is usually in a pleasant mood, which is not always the case with stroke survivors.

I hope someone finds these ideas helpful and applicable to their particular situation. If you would like to read more about our experience with stroke, recovery and caretaking, please read my book, Stroke Happens.

Best, Laura Ann Garren

 

Should I Stay or Should I Go?

25 Nov

When a spouse suffers a stroke, that person is changed, sometimes drastically and often forever. Some people can’t handle losing their loved one in this way; in fact, the rate of divorce increases more than 13% when a spouse is disabled.

I can see why some spouses leave their stroke survivors. Full-time caretaking is grinding, grueling work. I have stayed (12 years at the time of this writing) because I felt it was my only option. While I have been stressed and miserable much of the time during the post-stroke years, I know I wouldn’t be any happier if I had Chuck institutionalized. Also, I would have wanted him to stay with me, had the situation been reversed.

However, I did have to change my expectations in order to make the mental adjustment. Our relationship has changed, and I had to accept that. I had to redefine our marriage and to let go of my vision of future we were supposed to have. Not everyone can do so.

Before Chuck’s stroke, I used to be very judgmental of people who left spouses who got sick or disabled. I thought, “I would never do that.” Even though I was right, being put in that position made me more understanding of people who choose to leave. Ultimately, they have to live with themselves over their decision, and I can imagine how painful it would be.

When I “decided” to stay, it was not a moment in time. It was a realization that grew as I started to accept the fact that Chuck always would be without the ability to speak, read or write. As he is constrained by his disability, so am I; although in a different way, and voluntarily. I sometimes try to imagine being free, what I would do with my life, where I would go. My longing for freedom sometimes is intense and painful. But the pain I would cause Chuck outweighs my desire to be free.

I admit these very personal feelings because I suspect other people have them as well, and I want to assure them, “It’s normal.” In addition, I want to assert that full-time caretaking doesn’t have to define the caretaker. In my next post, I’ll relate how I was able to find fulfillment while still being the caretaker for my stroke survivor.

Best, Laura Ann Garren

Chuck and Laura

About Laura Ann Garren

21 Nov

Laura in Cuba.jpgI have been a writer for more than 25 years, starting out as a newspaper journalist. I’ve also been an editor and a teacher of college-level writing and literature courses, as well as a freelance writer and author of two books. I am also a certified dog trainer.

My most important job, however, is taking care of my husband Chuck, who suffered a massive stroke in 2007.

I started this blog in the hope of reaching people who find themselves in a caretaking role, whether for a survivor of a stroke or any other kind of disability. My goal, in this blog as well as in my book, also entitled Stroke Happens (2017), is to share my experiences so that others may benefit from them.

Best, Laura Ann Garren

Stroke Happens: A Resource for Survivors, Caretakers and Loved Ones

13 Jun

Welcome to my blog, Stroke Happens, a resource for anyone who has been affected by stroke. It’s also the title of my book about stroke, recovery and caretaking. If you are a stroke survivor or a caretaker, like I am, or if you are a loved one of someone who has suffered a stroke, I hope this blog will provide you with information and inspiration.

Stroke happened to us August 31, 2007, when I woke up to find my husband, Chuck, mute and paralyzed. He went to bed himself and woke up a different person, in effect. Although I didn’t realize it at the time, we had started out on a journey that would test the limits of love and endurance.

Chuck Self Portrait

Along the way, I learned many things only after I really needed the information. One of my goals in my Stroke Happens blog is to provide answers to questions that the reader hasn’t asked yet. I want to help other stroke survivors and their caretakers to avoid some of the obstacles I faced. I want to offer support to those who are dealing with stroke and its aftermath, to show that happiness is possible even after the most dramatic losses imaginable.

I hope you will find this website informative, entertaining and helpful. I also have a Facebook page by the same name (Stroke Happens); please check it out and click, “like.” Thanks for reading.

Best, Laura Ann Garren

 

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